The Incredible Edible Pickled Egg!

The pickled egg has captured my attention. I’m not sure why, I’m not a huge fan of pickled foods. I didn’t grow up with pickled eggs. I can’t remember how old I was the first time I saw one. I’m pretty sure it was on TV in some bar or back woods scene and I couldn’t help but wonder, “What the hell was that?” The first time I saw them in person I wondered, “How the hell?”and “Why?”

However, if you have chickens you may already be able to answer this question. Even if you don’t we are in the middle of some “egg” holidays such as Ostara and Easter. Growing up we were always trying to figure out what to do with all the leftover boiled eggs. The vinegar will extend the shelf life of the boiled eggs by quite a bit, thus delaying somewhat the enivitable, “I don’t want to eat any more eggs!” syndrome.

My very first attempt was not a tasty experience. I used “cider” vinegar from the big box style grocery store. In other words thinly disguised white vinegar, I don’t recommend this avenue at all. After some research, I found some recommendations to dilute the vinegar. This proved to be a vast improvement.

All of these recipes are designed for the refrigerator, these are not canning recipes.

It’s best to wait about seven days to eat the eggs. After three days, they will have a very strong vinegar taste, 7-14 days seems to be their prime time. The vinegar taste has faded and the egg taste is allowed to come through. After 14 days the vinegar makes a comeback. The Beet and Smoky eggs are ready much sooner than the Balsamic and Cider.

Pickled eggs can be just as plain hard boiled eggs would. Try some and let them liven up your salad, egg salad, or deviled eggs.

Balsamic & Cider Pickled Eggs

Apple Cider Pickled Eggs

1 cup apple cider
1 cup apple juice*
1 cup water
3 cinnamon sticks
½ Tbsp. fresh ginger, sliced in ¼ inch rounds
1 tsp. black pepper corns
1 medium apple, cut into bite size pieces
6 peeled hard boiled eggs

Combine the vinegar, apple juice, water, cinnamon sticks, ginger, and pepper in a sauce pan and bring to a boil. Simmer the mixture for 10 minutes.

Remove vinegar mixture from the burner and let cool for 10 minutes.

Place the eggs and apples in a glass or ceramic container and pour the vinegar mixture over them. Make sure eggs are completely submerged.

Let cool, cover the container, and keep in the refrigerator.

*Make sure your apple juice is real juice and 100% juice.

Balsamic Pickled Eggs

1 cup balsamic vinegar
1 cup white wine
1 cup water
2 large bay leaves
1 Tbsp. Italian spice mix
1 tsp. pepper corns
¾ cup sliced onion
5 whole peeled garlic cloves
6 peeled hard boiled eggs

Combine the vinegar, wine, water, bay leaves, spice mix, and pepper in a sauce pan and bring to a boil. Simmer the mixture for 7 minutes.

Remove vinegar mixture from the burner and let cool for 10 minutes.

Place the eggs, onion, and garlic in a glass or ceramic container and pour the vinegar mixture over them. Make sure eggs are completely submerged.

Let cool, cover the container, and keep in the refrigerator.

Beet Pickled Eggs

1 cup cider vinegar
1 cup juice from pickled beets
3 Tbsp. brown sugar
¼ tsp. salt
5 cloves garlic
½ cup sliced onion
6 peeled hard boiled eggs
Sliced pickled beets

Boil the vinegar, beet juice, brown sugar, salt, and garlic cloves for 7 minutes. Let mixture cool for about 15 minutes.

Meanwhile place the eggs, sliced onion, and pickled beets in a glass or ceramic container. Pour the vinegar mixture over the eggs making sure they are completely submerged.

Let cool, cover the container, and keep in the refrigerator.

Smokey Pickled Eggs

12.7 oz. malt vinegar*
12.7 oz. water*
5-8 cloves garlic
½ Tbsp. pickling spices
1 tsp. salt
¼ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
¼ tsp. liquid smoke
1 Tbsp. brown sugar
½ medium onion, thinly sliced
6 peeled hard boiled eggs

Combine all ingredients except the eggs and onion in a saucepan. Bring the ingredients to a boil and boil for 5 minutes. Allow it to cool for 10 minutes.

Layer the boiled eggs and sliced onions in a class or ceramic container. Pour the vinegar mixture over the eggs.

Let cool, cover the container, and keep in the refrigerator.

*The strange quantity is due to the size of the bottle I purchased. I simply used equal amounts of water and malt vinegar. Feel free to adjust the amount to the quantities you can purchase this ingredient in.

Have questions, comments, or suggestions? Leave it below or you can reach me at willamettefoodadventures@live.com, I’d love to hear from you!

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One response

  1. […] you find yourself in this situation, you might check out my recipe for pickled eggs as they’ll keep quite a bit longer than fresh ones. You could even use pickled eggs in Scotch […]

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